While drug deaths related to prescription painkillers have remained stable since 2012, deaths related to heroin use have increased by 39 percent. To combat this problem, this week the Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a new initiative aimed at reducing prescription opioid and heroin related overdose, death and dependence. 

When most of us think of poisons, we tend to envision items that aren’t intended for human consumption, like paint thinner or household cleaning solutions. But the misuse of medicines can be just as dangerous, especially among young children and tweens. That’s why, National Poison Prevention Week, observed March 15-21, presents an ideal opportunity to educate kids about medicine safety.

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) will host a webinar on April 8 from 1-2 p.m. EST about the dangers of synthetic drugs like “Spice” and “Bath Salts.” The webinar will also provide details on federal and local efforts to address this problem.

“What makes coalitions unique is their potential to combine the different perspectives, knowledge and skills of a group of people and organizations creating synergy,” is part of Sharron Michels’ email signature. And it is that belief in community-building that Michels believes makes her coalition unique.

On Wednesday, Senators Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) and Tim Kaine (D-Va.) introduced the Opioid Overdose Reduction Act, which would protect first responders, health professionals and family members who are educated in administering an opioid overdose prevention drug, such as naloxone (also known as Narcan) in an emergency situation of a drug overdose. Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.) plans to introduce companion legislation in the House of Representatives in the coming weeks. CADCA is among the organizations that endorsed the legislation.

A literature review published by researchers at the University of South Carolina shows that one in six college students misuse common stimulant medications prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Ritalin, Adderall and similar ADHD drugs are Schedule II controlled substances—the same as cocaine and methamphetamine.

Student psychology major Kari Benson and associate professor Kate Flory collaborated at the University of South Carolina's Parenting and Family Research Center, studying social impairment in children with ADHD.

Scientists may have found an answer for why for the past 15 years, death rates among Caucasian women in the United States have mysteriously surged: prescription painkillers.

“What makes coalitions unique is their potential to combine the different perspectives, knowledge and skills of a group of people and organizations creating synergy,” is part of Sharron Michels’ email signature. And it is that belief in community-building that Michels believes makes her coalition unique.

While the majority of primary care physicians are aware of and use state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) to reduce drug abuse and diversion, many do not access these programs routinely, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013,” suggests heroin overdose deaths have quadrupled since 2000, with the highest increase experienced in the Midwest.

Due to successful efforts at the local, state and federal level to reduce narcotic painkiller abuse, prescription drug addicts are turning to the cheaper, more accessible, and highly-addictiveheroin, the report states.

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